Jorge Moll: Give For Better Health

Research advises that holiday shopping can actually be important for one’s emotional well-being and health. There are benefits for the givers and recipients’ happiness and health. There are numerous ways in which giving is good for you and the community in which you live. Giving is good for our health, it makes us feel happy, it contributes to gratitude, it promotes social connection and cooperation, and giving is contagious.

 

Giving could increase a person’s longevity and physical health. This is because it can help with decreasing stress. Stress is linked to several health conditions and issues. Studies show that multiple forms of giving to others will increase health. When the elderly volunteered for their communities, they were 44 percent less likely to pass away after five years (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jorge_Moll2).

 

Giving makes people feel happy. Studies show that people are generally more happy giving gifts than receiving them. In 2006, Jorge Moll and associates found that giving to charities will activate pleasure regions of the brain (JorgeMoll.com). This creates the “warm glow” effect of gift giving.

 

Offering or receiving gifts can evoke gratitude in people. When you show gratitude for actions or words, it will increase positivity. Gratitude is important to social bonding, health, and happiness.

 

Giving promotes social connection and cooperation“, says Jorge Moll. The act of giving to others will promote cooperation and trust that will strengthen ties to others. This, in turn, promotes better physical and mental health.

 

The act of giving is contagious. When a person gives generously, it will inspire others to show generosity later. Research shows that each person in a social network can influence hundreds of people, even if they have never met before.

 

Jorge Moll, MD, Ph.D., has actively participated in many research articles and education. He is the president of the governing board of the D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR). He shows intense interest in neural and psychological mechanisms that govern social preferences. They are shaped by values and morals that are modified by culture, personal experience, and neurotechnological interventions.

 

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